Sunday, September 7, 2014

Kandinsky on the Spiritual Element in Art and the Three Responsibilities of Artists

Shared from Zite

 "[In great art] the spectator does feel a corresponding thrill in himself. Such harmony or even contrast of emotion cannot be superficial or worthless; indeed the Stimmung of a picture can deepen and purify that of the spectator. Such works of art at least preserve the soul from coarseness; they "key it up," so to speak, to a certain height, as a tuning-key the strings of a musical instrument."

 

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Kandinsky on the Spiritual Element in Art and the Three Responsibilities of Artists

Brain Pickings - "Art is a form of nourishment (of consciousness, the spirit)," 31-year-old Susan Sontag wrote in her diary in 1964. "Art holds out the promise of inner wholeness," wrote Alain de Botton half a century later in the excellent Art as Therapy. But perhaps the greatest meditation on how art serves the soul came more than a century earlier, in 1910, when legendary Russian painter and art theorist Wassily Kandinsky published Concerning the Spiritual in Art (free download; public library) — an exploration of the deepest and most authentic motives for making art, the "internal necessity" that impels artists to create as a spiritual impulse and audiences to admire art as a spiritual hunger.

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