Tuesday, February 8, 2011

ROA's street art - Boing Boing

Sent to you by SangiovanniArt via Google Fast Flip:



ROA's street art - Boing Boing

I think that a more careful distinction between 'graffiti' and 'street art' and 'tagging' needs to be established for these discussions. This is some kind of 'street art': it doesn't promote one gang against another, or against the police, or against the local population. Frankly, it makes this particular wall much more attractive, and likely makes the people who live close to it a lot happier. Carleton University's campus is connected by a maze of pedestrian tunnels. Obviously, the tunnel walls have graffiti. But artists avoid putting new graffiti on top of something else that they like. So as the good spots became full, a social dynamic emerged. I wonder if anyone has studied it. 99% of graffiti is the mindless tagging crap. A pathetic need to say "pay attention to me!" The equivalent to a dog peeing on every place it can. This is art, some effort, skill, and thought was put into it but sadly this is very rare. "Delightful and imaginative" is in the eye of the beholder, I guess. The examples might be neat to see once or twice, but I wouldn't want them in my neighborhood. Better than disorganized graffiti? by a long shot. But monochrome walls would better, imho. People are free to their own opinions about art. Not all of us are fans of public art. Hate be a wet blanket, but you can call it "street art" all you want, but if you're sneaking out and painting on someone else's building, it's graffiti and vandalism. If I showed up and this was on the front of my store, pretty or not, I'd be painting over it. "Graffiti is often a harmful imposition on communities" graffiti is at worst ugly, at best beautiful. socially, it is often one of the most effective barriers to the gentrification-driven displacement that affects poor and working-class communities. rich folks don't want to move somewhere where their walls can get tagged, somewhere where members of the community are visually claiming space as their own. one of the first signs of impending large-scale displacement is the enforcement of anti-graffiti laws. in new york city, we've seen that from the lower east side to harlem, from sunset park to long island city....

Read full story